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The Collapse of Schengen: The beginning of the end?

The Collapse of Schengen: The beginning of the end?
Léa Duplan

Léa Duplan

Léa is a 2nd year Master of Public Policy student at the Hertie School of Governance. Currently, she is on a leave of absence to expand her practical experience. Prior to her MPP studies, she did her Bachelor's degree in European Studies at Maastricht University in the Netherlands. Her main domains of interests are: Good Governance, Sustainable Development and European Affairs.
Léa Duplan
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Author: Lea Duplan The creation of the Schengen area (1995) made it possible to enhance a fundamental right in the European Union: the free movement of people. Since the agreement, 1.7 million people started earning their salary in a different country than the one they live in. A possible disintegration of Schengen would then pose […]

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The Lost Generation: Euro-Scepticism among European Youth

The Lost Generation: Euro-Scepticism among European Youth
Karina Oborune

Karina Oborune

In 2012 and 2014 Karina Oborune was employed as a research assistantat University of Oxford and in 2013 and 2014-2015 as a researcher at University of Latvia and at University of Lucerne. In May 2014 she was employed at EU-Vox project and in 2012-2013worked at the headquarters of ESN as a researcher at ESNSurvey team. She has received her BA degree from the University of Latvia and participated in the Erasmus exchange at Sciences Po in France, she has received her Masters in Political Science, Economics and Law from the University of Basel in Switzerland and at CEU in Budapest, Hungary. Ms. Oborune is currently a PhD Candidate in Political Science at University of Latvia, and member of EPSA, IAPSS, EUSA, UACES and BAICE.She has presented at 22 international conferences including University of Cambridge, EP Model in Strasbourg, UN Model in New York and is author of more than 11 academic publications.
Karina Oborune
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 Author: Karina Oborune Since the outset of the economic and financial crisis in Europe, the level of European identity and solidarity has seemed to lessen. The crisis has caused much political controversy, electoral volatility and civil strife, affecting political parties, voting behaviour and governing institutions. Euroscepticism is no longer just a British disease – the […]

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The integrative power of the threat of disintegration

The integrative power of the threat of disintegration
Florian Trauner

Florian Trauner

Florian Trauner is a research professor in European Studies at the Flemish Free University of Brussels (VUB). His research interests include asylum policies, migration policies and home affairs of the European Union. He is an author of many articles in renowned academic journals, and co-author of the book (2015) titled Policy Change in the Area of Freedom, Security and Justice: how EU institutions matter, published with Routledge, London.
Florian Trauner

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  Author: Florian Trauner The EU is entering a playing field in which it has little experience – European disintegration. EU interior ministers have openly threatened to expel Greece from the Schengen border-free zone and to seal the country off to the rest of Europe at the Macedonian border. While Greece faces the threat of […]

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The future of EU youth policy: Democracy in puberty

The future of EU youth policy: Democracy in puberty
Yago Bastin

Yago Bastin

Yago graduated as a political scientist with specialization in European politics. He obtained a second Master’s degree in General Economics. During his studies he was offered a spot on the board of JEF Ghent, and also had the opportunity to intern at the European Parliament, at the cabinet of MEP Guy Verhofstadt, president of the ALDE Group. Currently he is doing an internship at the Policy and Advocacy department of the European Youth Forum. He is in charge of monitoring the work of the European institutions with a focus on youth issues.
Yago Bastin
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Author: Yago Bastin There are two reasons that can justify this strong statement in the lead. The first one is the alienation of young people from the political system. The second one is the rise of xenophobic and extremist groups all over Europe. Let me first point out how these evolutions are indeed threatening our […]

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What does research tell us about Erasmus+?

What does research tell us about Erasmus+?
Karina Oborune

Karina Oborune

In 2012 and 2014 Karina Oborune was employed as a research assistantat University of Oxford and in 2013 and 2014-2015 as a researcher at University of Latvia and at University of Lucerne. In May 2014 she was employed at EU-Vox project and in 2012-2013worked at the headquarters of ESN as a researcher at ESNSurvey team. She has received her BA degree from the University of Latvia and participated in the Erasmus exchange at Sciences Po in France, she has received her Masters in Political Science, Economics and Law from the University of Basel in Switzerland and at CEU in Budapest, Hungary. Ms. Oborune is currently a PhD Candidate in Political Science at University of Latvia, and member of EPSA, IAPSS, EUSA, UACES and BAICE.She has presented at 22 international conferences including University of Cambridge, EP Model in Strasbourg, UN Model in New York and is author of more than 11 academic publications.
Karina Oborune
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Author: Karina Oborune Erasmus+ was launched in 1987 and so far has given opportunity to more than 3 million students, who received a first–hand insight into the social, cultural and political reality of different European societies. For many of them this was a life-changing  experience, giving a true meaning of ‘Europe’ for hundreds of thousands […]

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The European political identity is still under construction

The European political identity is still under construction

Athena Tacet

Athena Tacet is a journalist and editor specializing in foreign affairs, human rights and socio-political issues. Her writings have appeared in Al Jazeera English, The Huffington Post, Slate Magazine, and Embassy Magazine, a weekly Canadian foreign policy newspaper. She holds a BA in political science, a Certificate in Modern Arabic language and culture, a Graduate diploma in journalism and undertook a Master's degree in public policy at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. Her interests include the EU foreign policy, issues related to immigration and asylum policies, as well as nationalism and identity politics in Europe.
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The European Union is at a crossroads between facing more divisions and hostilities on the one hand, and working towards the integration of various heritages into the creation of a unified identity on the other. Author: Athena Tacet In an attempt to set right a historical wrong, the Spanish government announced earlier this summer that […]

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Trust through transparency?

Trust through transparency?
Mathis Hampel

Mathis Hampel

Mathis Hampel holds a PhD in Social Science and Public Policy from King's College London. Trained as a natural scientist with a BSc in Ecosystem Analysis from Lund University, and an MSc in Physical Geography from Exeter University, Mathis became more and more interested in the politics of global governance. As science student equipped with expert knowledge of both the science and the politics of, inter alia, climate change and geoengineering, he is particularly interested in how knowledge and social order are co-produced across space and time.
Mathis Hampel
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There is a general sense that our political institutions are experiencing a crisis of trust. Only recently, the Luxembourg tax scandal – under Jean-Claude Juncker the country signed secret tax deals with 350 international companies – caused a public outcry. Indirectly related to this crisis are the many transparency provisions with which the European Union […]

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European Space Policy: Time to wake up from hibernation?

European Space Policy: Time to wake up from hibernation?

Justina Vaikutyte

Justina is currently an MA candidate in Public Policy at the Central European University. Prior to her studies she had been working as a researcher in the Public Policy and Management Institute in Lithuania. She was responsible for EU-wide research and evaluation projects delegated by the European Commission, mainly in the area of education and training.

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The European Space Agency’s (ESA) Rosetta mission created an unprecedented moment of space exploration by putting a spacecraft on the comet’s surface for the first time in history. The Philae lander managed to accomplish the primary goal of its mission and then hibernated for an indefinite amount of time. So did the European space policy […]

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The Actual Effects of Changing Formal Voting Rules in the Council of the EU

Mario Munta

Mario Munta

Mario is a PhD student in Public Policy at the Central European University. His doctoral thesis deals with the Europeanisation modes of employment policies in Croatia. He obtained his MA in Public Policy. Thus far, he assisted in teaching and research at the University of Zagreb and the ECPR Summer School in Methods. His main research interests center around EU public policy, social and employment policy and sustainable development.
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In a recent article conveyed by Politheor.net, Attila Marján put forward numerous assumptions concerning the change of the blocking and policy-shaping power of the Visegrad Group – V4 (Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Slovakia) in the post-Lisbon era of the Council of the European Union (Council). The author voiced his concerns amid the most recent changes […]

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The New EU Voting system – the old west-east north-south division

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Attila Marján

Hungarian economist, PhD in international relations. Based in Brussels for fourteen years as diplomat and member of EU commissioners’ cabinets. Two times visiting fellow of Wilson Center in Washington DC. University professor and author of books on EU affairs and geopolitics. Head of department, National University of Public Administration, Budapest.
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Economic governance reforms and Eurozone consolidation has significant institutional and political consequences: a multiple-tier integration is ever more realistic. „Out” countries seek to mitigate the negative impact of these developments. In this respect V4 – Visegrad countries differ a lot: Slovakia, a relative latecomer in economic reforms is part of the currency union. Poland, Hungary […]

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