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Childhood is not a crime

Childhood is not a crime
Polina Vershinina

Polina Vershinina

Policy Researcher at Politheor
Polina Vershinina has a BA in International Relations at Saint Petersburg State University, Russia. Currently she is a MA student in Political Science in Central European University, Hungary. She specializes in global political dialogue and institutional development. Her research focuses on the EU, more specifically on Central Europe, migration policy, civil society and NGOs. She is a strong supporter of a cross-disciplinary approach in international relations research.
Polina Vershinina

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Recently public indignation at the government policy related to the separation of migrant families in the United States has finally produced a result. President Trump signed an executive order June 20th declaring the continuation of such a policy is unacceptable. It would seem that this is the end of another scandalous and disturbing news cycle […]

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Walking the talk: Going national to make the SDGs beneficial for Indigenous Peoples

Walking the talk: Going national to make the SDGs beneficial for Indigenous Peoples
Ann-Kathrin Beck

Ann-Kathrin Beck

Policy Researcher at Politheor
Ann-Kathrin Beck is currently finishing up her graduate degree in the Erasmus Mundus Masters Program in Public Policy at the Institut Barcelona d’Estudis Internacionals and the School of Public Policy, Central European University, Budapest. Previously, she has gained professional experiences with the German Agency for Development Cooperation (GIZ) in Ghana, Konrad Adenauer Foundation in Indonesia and the German Embassy in Kazakhstan, always eager to find the connections between environmental and development policies – her two main research interests. Her master thesis focusses on the external dimension and potentials of EU forest governance.
Ann-Kathrin Beck
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The 10th anniversary of the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) last month has drawn great attention to the more than 370 million indigenous people, occupying 22 percent of the global land area. Many of them are among the poorest of the poor, and suffer from discrimination and inequalities. Therefore, indigenous peoples are […]

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The Fumes of War

The Fumes of War
Barbara Lewis

Barbara Lewis

Barbara Lewis, Ph.D., heads the Trotter Institute for the Study of Black History and Culture at UMass Boston, and is tenured in the Department of English. As a cultural historian, she has published on lynching in drama, the minstrel stage, and the black arts movement. For over fifteen years, she wrote theater, film, and performance reviews and covered the arts scene in New York. Dr. Lewis has taught at City College, Lehman, New York University, and chaired the Department of Theatre at the University of Kentucky.
Barbara Lewis

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When did I realize a change was coming, an internal war percolating, like coffee on the fire? I smelled it first. “It’s not over yet,” I said in the back seat of an Uber pool. “How can you say that?” my riding companion asked.  He was Asian, tall and thin, a recent college graduate with […]

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Reserved seats in Parliament hurt rather than help Kenyan female candidates

Reserved seats in Parliament hurt rather than help Kenyan female candidates
David Monda

David Monda

I am a Professor of Political Science at the City University of New York's Guttman Community College. My undergraduate and graduate degrees are in International Relations from Alliant International University in San Diego. My specialization is in International Economics and Foreign Policy for my MA degree. I'm a doctoral candidate (2019) for a Phd. in. Political Science at the City University of New York's Graduate Center in Mid-Town Manhattan. My research interests are securitization of refugee policy and international humanitarian law. I have taught a range of Political Science, International Relations and Public Administration courses in the United States, Brazil, South Africa and Kenya. I also regularly provide media contributions on a range of topical issues concerning International Affairs on Voice of America, Deutsche Welle, Citizen and Nation Television.
David Monda
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The two-thirds gender rule is a constitutional requirement which ensures that no more than two-thirds of elective and appointive bodies are composed of the same gender. Despite an increase in the number of women elected into office in this election (and the ones likely to be nominated), we still haven’t reached the two-thirds threshold and […]

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Gender parity in governments: Can we force it?

Gender parity in governments: Can we force it?

Sandra Bahous

Policy Researcher at Politheor
Sandra is a New-York qualified attorney and holds a bachelor's degree in finance from McGill University. In the past year, she has worked with Amnesty International on raising awareness on cases involving prisoners of conscience, refugee rights, and capital punishment. She is currently a Research Associate at the Harvard Business School working alongside a professor on research and case writing for an MBA course on leadership and corporate accountability. She is interested in bringing forth policy issues arising in the Middle East including gender equality, political economy, and human rights.
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He added that it was important for Canada to have a cabinet that looked like the country it represented. Straightforward (isn’t it?). If the entire world is made up of approximately 50% males and 50% females, then why is it that countries all around the world are hesitant to appoint women to positions of power […]

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Good practices on disability rights: no more stones on the road

Good practices on disability rights: no more stones on the road
Satzhan Mukatayev

Satzhan Mukatayev

Policy Researcher at Politheor
Satzhan M. Mukatayev is currently pursuing Bachelor degree in International law at Al-Farabi Kazakh National University (Kazakhstan), he completed an internship in “School of International Diplomacy”. He also works at private firm as Junior Lawyer. His interests lie in international private law, integration, human rights.
Satzhan Mukatayev

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Moreover, poverty rates amongst people with disabilities are 70% higher than average. More than 30% of people with disabilities over 75 years old are restricted to some extent, and 20% are severely restricted. The percentage of people with disabilities is set to rise as the European Union population ages. The European Union and its Member […]

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Indigenous resiliency through renewable energy

Indigenous resiliency through renewable energy

Angela Reed Clavijo

Policy Researcher at Politheor: European Policy Network
Angela Reed Clavijo has been working to promote economic and social advancements first locally in post-Katrina New Orleans then globally out of San Francisco, California. She is currently part of a team of Responsible Sourcing Managers working with large corporations to understand and encourage improvements of their suppliers' working conditions.
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While claimed to be the safest and most efficient method to transport oil, its construction has come at the expense of indigenous rights violations and a neglect of the environment –a reflection of the United States’ seemingly relentless approach for quick business gains. Many US news sources claim there was not an adequate consultation with […]

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Europe’s ‘Other’ Refugees: Denying asylum to the continent’s most persecuted minority

Europe’s ‘Other’ Refugees: Denying asylum to the continent’s most persecuted minority
John Trajer

John Trajer

Policy Researcher at Politheor
John Trajer holds a BA in English Language and Literature from the University of Oxford, and is currently working at a Brussels-based NGO while completing his MA in European Studies. His research focuses on the relationship between different forms of citizenship and mobility in Europe, with a special interest in the migration patterns of Roma EU and non-EU citizens.
John Trajer
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The ‘safe countries of origin’ concept has been a controversial feature of the EU common asylum system since its adoption under the Asylum Procedures Directive in 2005. The practice of using accelerated procedures to assess claims from ‘safe’ countries has generated several legal debates, recently coming under renewed scrutiny from the International Federation of Human […]

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Women trafficking and the US’s worrisome silence

Women trafficking and the US’s worrisome silence

Angela Reed Clavijo

Policy Researcher at Politheor: European Policy Network
Angela Reed Clavijo has been working to promote economic and social advancements first locally in post-Katrina New Orleans then globally out of San Francisco, California. She is currently part of a team of Responsible Sourcing Managers working with large corporations to understand and encourage improvements of their suppliers' working conditions.
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According to a 2012 ILO report, an estimated 20.9 million people globally are victims of forced labor. Of these, 55% are female and 45% male. This 10% difference is attributed to women and girls’ involvement in sex trafficking, as men and boys are predominantly involved in other types of forced labor. Data is limited for […]

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Women in Tunisia: A democratic façade or a civil society’s struggle?

Women in Tunisia: A democratic façade or a civil society’s struggle?
Monica Esposito

Monica Esposito

Policy Researcher at Politheor: European Policy Network
Monica Esposito holds an MA in International Conflict and Security from the Brussels School of International Studies. She collaborates with research centres in Italy and she is currently an intern at the Chaire Baillet Latour at the University of Louvain-la-Neuve.
Monica Esposito
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During the election in 2014 in Tunisia, women outnumbered men among registered voters. Women were greatly encouraged to vote because their rights were not only considered, but there was also a wish to enhance them. Political parties, well aware of this trend, proposed female candidates to gather votes from the female electorate: among 13,000 parliamentary […]

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