Tag Archives: analysis

Biodiversity loss, so important yet not so popular issue

Biodiversity loss, so important yet not so popular issue

Darragh Cunningham

Policy Researcher at Politheor: European Policy Network
Darragh Cunningham holds an MSc in Environmental Policy from University College Dublin. He is primarily interested in policy issues related to climate change, green infrastructure, smart cities, sustainability and urbanisation. Darragh has recently undertaken a policy research internship for the Green Party in Ireland. From January 2017 he shall be part of the Projects Team for the EuroCities Network in Brussels on a work experience placement.
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The Issue at Hand In terms of its impact, biodiversity loss is an enormous challenge which spans the entire planet. In spite of this, the issue has not gained traction within policy circles nor entered into the public psyche in the same way as concerns such as climate change or the threat of nuclear conflict.  […]

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2016 was a terrible year for climate change. Will 2017 be worse?

2016 was a terrible year for climate change. Will 2017 be worse?

Charlotte McLaughlin

Policy Researcher at Politheor
Charlotte’s background is in Politics and Economics at University College Dublin but she has had a long interest in journalism - having worked previously for the BBC and Irish radio stations. As a reporter at shecco, Charlotte is covering breaking news about climate friendly technology in the HVACR industry. She currently writes for online industry platforms and contributes regularly to shecco’s Accelerate Magazines. She is also currently writing for Politheor about the environment and energy.

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Now, after a year of disappointments, it does not seem very likely. Climate change is moving faster than previously predicted. The first six months of 2016 were the warmest six-month period in NASA’s modern temperature record, which dates back to 1880. The devastating effects of global temperature rise might be here sooner than we think. […]

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Why Leave won and what’s next for the UK

Why Leave won and what’s next for the UK
Marta Cioci
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Marta Cioci

Policy Researcher at Politheor: European Policy Network
I am currently enrolled in the MA in European Affairs programme at Sciences Po, Paris. Having graduated with a dissertation on the Ukrainian crisis from my BA Hons in International Relations and Development Studies at the University of Westminster, London, I have developed an interest in EU relations with Russia. My research primarily focuses on EU governance, migration, geopolitics, issues of conflict solving, diplomacy, nuclear weapons. My interests are also ethno-nationalism, notions of mass obedience and group conformism, the concept of nation-state, and the 1930s totalitarianist regimes in Europe.
Marta Cioci
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The Leave campaign could also count on the lack of cohesiveness within the Remainers, backed by an internally fragmented Tory coalition and by an ambivalent Jeremy Corbyn. The outspoken Sadiq Khan and Nicola Sturgeon remained isolated voices in the cacophony of the In-campaign. Boris Johnson and Michael Gove proved to be able to better sell […]

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Relearning democracy: At the crossroads of Spanish elections

Relearning democracy: At the crossroads of Spanish elections
Irene Zugasti

Irene Zugasti

Editor at Politheor: European Policy Network
Irene Zugasti is a journalist and a political scientist from Madrid, who conducted her studies of Political Sciences and Public Administration in Complutense University in Madrid and Charles University in Prague. She holds an MA in International Relations and Diplomacy of the Diplomat School of Spain, where she focused her research on Gender and IR studies. Nowadays she works in the Government Office for Gender Based Violence in Spain, while she continues researching Gender issues in the European arena.
Irene Zugasti
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Back to the beginning Let us go back to that 2011 May afternoon when hundreds of thousands of people marched in all the main cities of Spain. It seemed that the simple but reasonable claim of the 15-M platform: REAL DEMOCRACY NOW, had found an open ear among the Spanish population. Why? The key to […]

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REPORT: The dark reality of Dunkirk’s refugee camp

REPORT: The dark reality of Dunkirk’s refugee camp

Stephen Treacy

Stephen Treacy is a graduate of Human Geography at the University of the West of England, Bristol. His research interests span across the field including, but not limited to national identity, xenophobia, clandestine migration, globalisation and urban Geography. Currently he is engaged in voluntary aid work and research within the Grande Synthe refugee camp in Dunkirk, France, whilst re-locating to Krakow, Poland to begin ground work for studying Polish nationalism.

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Author: Stephen Treacy Amongst the marshy, coastal French Flanders lies a town once famed for it’s historic part played in the Second World War. The city of Dunkirk is one of France’s major port towns, with direct connections to the United Kingdom by ferry, and it lies mere kilometres from the border with Belgium. Whilst […]

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Talking to my daughter about the economy (Book review)

Talking to my daughter about the economy (Book review)

Dušan Pavlović

Mr Dušan Pavlović is a Professor at the Faculty of Political Sciences, University of Belgrade, where he teaches political economy. He is known as one of the pioneers in studying rational choice theory in political science and public choice theory in Serbia. Mr Pavlovic has published books in political economy, consolidation of the democratic institutions in Serbia, as well as many research articles.

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I expected a lot from Varoufakis’s economics for teenagers. I believe that basics of economics and entrepreneurship have to be part of the high school curricula (possibly even of the last grades of the elementary school). Citizens who possess basic economic knowledge could more easily understand manipulations performed by politicians (when salaries and pensions are […]

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Potentials and limits of natural gas exports as an instrument of Russia’s foreign EU policy

Potentials and limits of natural gas exports as an instrument of Russia’s foreign EU policy

Carl Johannes Muth

Visiting researcher at Central European University.
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Author: Carl Johannes Muth In the last decade and particularly amidst the backdrop of the current crisis in Ukraine, Russia has increasingly been labeled with numerous unflattering terms such as “evil empire” (Voltaire 01/14/2006) or the “enemy number one” (Foreign Policy 6/24/2013). Nowadays the Russian Federation is widely seen as a state ruled by Vladimir […]

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The New EU Voting system – the old west-east north-south division

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Attila Marján

Hungarian economist, PhD in international relations. Based in Brussels for fourteen years as diplomat and member of EU commissioners’ cabinets. Two times visiting fellow of Wilson Center in Washington DC. University professor and author of books on EU affairs and geopolitics. Head of department, National University of Public Administration, Budapest.
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Economic governance reforms and Eurozone consolidation has significant institutional and political consequences: a multiple-tier integration is ever more realistic. „Out” countries seek to mitigate the negative impact of these developments. In this respect V4 – Visegrad countries differ a lot: Slovakia, a relative latecomer in economic reforms is part of the currency union. Poland, Hungary […]

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2014 UN Climate Conference in Lima, Peru: Same Old, Same Old

Mario Munta

Mario Munta

Mario is a PhD student in Public Policy at the Central European University. His doctoral thesis deals with the Europeanisation modes of employment policies in Croatia. He obtained his MA in Public Policy. Thus far, he assisted in teaching and research at the University of Zagreb and the ECPR Summer School in Methods. His main research interests center around EU public policy, social and employment policy and sustainable development.
Mario Munta
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The 2014 UN Climate Talks leave once again a bad taste in the mouth of many after the Lima Accords were passed on Saturday night in Lima, Peru. The devils of the past are, unfortunately, still alive. A usual impasse has marked every single UN Climate Conference ever since the groundbreaking Rio Summit in 1992, […]

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25 years after 9/11 – How many Germanies should Europe have?

Anis H. Bajrektarević

For past 15 years, he teaches subjects of Geo-political Affairs, International Law (including Intl. Relations, Law of IOs and EU Law) and Sustainable Development (Institutions and Instruments of). Besides, he served as a pro bono expert to numerous academic institutions, think-tanks and intergovernmental institutions (such as the UN ECE, OSCE, Council of Europe, American Bar, Oxford Academy of Total Intelligence, etc.). He is a Professor and Chairperson Intl. Law & Global Political Studies at the IMC University of Austria.

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originally published on: Modern Diplomacy . Ever since the Peace of Westphalia, Europe maintained the inner balance of powers by keeping its core section soft. Peripheral powers like England, France, Denmark, (Sweden and Poland being later replaced by) Prussia, the Ottomans, Habsburgs and Russia have pressed and preserved the center of continental Europe as their […]

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