• Emilie Bartolini
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    Emilie Bartolini

    Emilie is a half Dutch – half Italian Master Student at the College of Europe in Bruges, where she specializes in EU Politics. Before moving to Belgium, she studied at the University of Florence a Bachelor in Political Science and spent a year in the UK, where she graduated with a Master in Democracy and Comparative Politics at University College London. Her main research focus is on Democracy within the EU and Inter-institutional relations, although she also likes to read and write about electoral politics in Western European countries.

Author's Posts

  • Does faster legislation come at the cost of transparency?

    Does faster legislation come at the cost of transparency?0

    One of the main goals of the post-Lisbon Institutional reforms was to make EU decision-making more efficient. Following many claims that EU legislative processes are overly bureaucratized, the main goal of such efforts was to make the EU law-making more fit for the many ongoing challenges requiring great institutional re-activeness. The result of such fitness operation is quite striking.

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  • Brexit: a matter of identity politics?

    Brexit: a matter of identity politics?0

    Although European leaders plan to relaunch European integration in the post-Brexit era, the European discourse over the Irish border shows that economic rhetoric prevails over political discourse. This brings us back to the ever-existing contradiction between the EU’s rhetorical objectives and its material interests.

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  • Changing everything so that nothing changes? The future of UK seats in the EP

    Changing everything so that nothing changes? The future of UK seats in the EP0

    As the 2019 elections get closer, the future allocation of 73 UK seats in the European Parliament remains an unsolved conundrum. The long-debated proposal of substituting them with a pan-European list of candidates from European Political parties is welcomed with enthusiasm by the Brussels establishment. However, little attention is often devoted to its indirect consequences if not well thought through: more power to bigger Member States, whose candidates would emerge as privileged, and institutional deadlock, as a unanimity of Member States is required to agree according to the rules on Treaty Change.

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  • Realpolitik still determines EU responses to Rule of Law threats. Here is why.

    Realpolitik still determines EU responses to Rule of Law threats. Here is why.0

    A decisive action against Poland and Hungary for violating the Rule of Law has been vocally called by many in Brussels and beyond. However, EU Institutions have failed to take effective action against their infants terribles so far. This can be explained by Member States’ reluctance to accept EU intrusion in national constitutional matters and by the Commission’s unwillingness to create tensions with national public opinions.

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