• A troubled journey ahead: Theresa May’s trade bill

    A troubled journey ahead: Theresa May’s trade bill0

    The House of Commons is currently reviewing a package of laws, introduced over the last year by Theresa May’s government, which will have a major impact on the post-Brexit future of the United Kingdom. The European Union, the Taxation and the Trade bills will implement the legal framework for exiting the European Union. Trade is one of the key issues the UK is facing – as it leaves the European Union, it will lose the benefits of over 40 trade agreements which account for almost 25% of UK’s exports outside of the EU. This law will ensure the transition out of the European common commercial policy and should minimize the impact of Brexit on UK’s economy. However, the government’s project is inherently flawed and is facing resistance as it passes through the legislative process.

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  • International Trade by the People, for the People

    International Trade by the People, for the People0

    Inequality is rising, wages are declining, local businesses are dying, and poverty remains; resources are being exhausted and climate change is destroying ecosystems whilst increasing the magnitude of natural disasters. Meanwhile, international trade deals that exasperate all of these problems continue to be agreed behind closed doors. In the name of profit, power and domination, the world’s rich elite continue to ensure our planet’s resources and wealth remain monopolised in their hands whilst presenting us with a glossy façade of global trade deals as essential for our prosperity. It is against this backdrop that voices have been raised in Malaysia, demanding trade agreements incorporate a radical, pro-people, pro-environment ‘people’s charter’.

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  • Sacrificing sovereignty and human potential in the name of economic growth

    Sacrificing sovereignty and human potential in the name of economic growth0

    Why are countries so gripped in their quest for economic growth that they are empowering multinational corporations at the expense of their citizens? Instead of signing one-sided Bilateral Investment Treaties that chisel away at their domestic sovereignty, these countries should consider dropping their fixation with BITs, and focus on other ways in which to encourage mutually beneficial investment in sectors crucial to sustainable, pro-poor development.

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  • Are we moving forward? – A new-generation of trade agreements for the EU

    Are we moving forward? – A new-generation of trade agreements for the EU0

    A reform of trade and investment agreements has been undergoing over the past ten years. While these agreements used to focus solely on facilitating the movement of goods and capitals, their scope is wider today and covers contemporary issues. The European trade policy also evolved and gave birth to a new-generation of free-trade agreements such as the ones concluded with Singapore, Canada or Vietnam. Several factors drove this wave of reform towards a more comprehensive approach to trade and should lead to further improvements.

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  • Japan-EU trade deal:  an uneven road ahead for EU car manufacturers?

    Japan-EU trade deal: an uneven road ahead for EU car manufacturers?1

    The Japan-EU Economic Partnership Agreement (JEEPA) is especially beneficial for the Japanese car industry as it reduces tariff barriers on car imports from Japan. This new deal reinforces Japan’s trade strength in the car industry and asserts their growing dominance in the sector. The flip side of the deal ‘coining’ reveals two interesting aspects. One, in exchange of tariff reduction for Japanese cars, the EU will obtain tariff reductions mainly on its agricultural exports to Japan; more significantly on cheese. Two, the EU automobile market is offering a larger latitude to a country which is already a daunting competitor in the sector. Is the deal sending the EU on an uneven road?

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  • Brexit and the single market: Norway or No way

    Brexit and the single market: Norway or No way0

    After recent declarations by Theresa May and David Davis, the UK’s conservative government seems to be convinced that a “hard” Brexit is the best option for the country. Discussions with the EU over the UK’s participation in the single market seem to have been halted and the Norwegian European model rejected. This is terrible news for UK trade and especially for the services sector which is the UK’s most important trading sector, with a trade surplus equating to 5% of the national income (about $138 billion).

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