• It is time for innovation in the EU’s agriculture!

    It is time for innovation in the EU’s agriculture!1

    The agricultural sector encounters undoubtedly a form of crisis in Europe. In France, hundreds of farmers continue to unleash a torrent of almost daily protests against the collapse of milk and pork prices. In Italy, the situation is alarming too. Last year, Coldiretti, Europe’s largest agricultural professional organisation, rang an alarm bell: agriculture may disappear in thirty-two years in Italy.

    READ MORE
  • The ethics of NGOs and what happens when it fails

    The ethics of NGOs and what happens when it fails2

    Big non-governmental organisations (NGOs) like Greenpeace can have enormous impact on people’s perceptions of environmental issues. Their campaign against genetically modified foods is a good example. However, when they use that influence to further their own agenda, rather than the public good, it can have very serious consequences.

    READ MORE
  • City-led climate change mitigation: persisting inequalities

    City-led climate change mitigation: persisting inequalities0

    The role of cities in efforts for global emission reductions are high on the global agenda. However, the reality of the funding gap between the demand for investment from cities in the developing world, and the capacity to mobilise funds, brings to the fore the stark inequalities that endure between developed and developing states.

    READ MORE
  • The new Olympic golf course: Risks vs. benefits?

    The new Olympic golf course: Risks vs. benefits?4

    The new golf course for Rio Olympics has been the cause of huge controversy between the city`s government and the activists, leading to the movement “Occupy Golf”. The government claims that the new golf course inside the nature reserve has increased the biodiversity, but the protesters are right to be worried about the risks of such an intervention.

    READ MORE
  • Not-so-green games for a blue planet

    Not-so-green games for a blue planet0

    The organisers of the Rio Olympic Games promised to clean up Rio’s dangerously polluted waterways and provide sanitation for at least 80% of the inhabitants before 2016. As the games draw near, they admit that they have failed, but claim that there are no risks to athletes or to the general public.

    READ MORE
  • The Rio Olympics: Green or a Greenwash?

    The Rio Olympics: Green or a Greenwash?1

    Rio won the honour to host the Olympic Games on the idealistic promise it will leave a “sustainable legacy”. There is, however, a distinct difference between the ideal and the reality when the Olympic Sustainable Management Plan fails to combat the booming Brazilian illegal wildlife trade. The international community are on one hand promoting Rio as green, but on the other accepting their contribution to what the UN has recently found to be ‘an unprecedented threat to wildlife’ by allowing Rio to host the world’s biggest international sporting event.

    READ MORE

Latest Posts